new logo. new look.

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just finished designing a new logo for my scubajer.com brand. look out for it at dive shops, resorts and dive boats around the world! it was time for a new look. new logo. but same professional diving instruction provided for your enjoyment! having grown up in the great pacific northwest United States, I’ve always been a fan of the resident Orcas – more commonly known as “killer whales.” Orca’s really aren’t whales at all. they’re actually members of the dolphin family. they are the top predator of all the oceans – with a brain much larger than a human’s – and one of the most intelligent ocean-going species in the world unique in that they can reason, think and problem-solve as individuals and in family groups called pods. my new logo also incorporates the PADI (Professional Association of Diving Instructors) worldwide logo as I am a certified PADI dive instructor. the internationaly recognized “diver below” signal flag (red with single white stripe) on the orca’s pectoral fin is a tribute to the scuba diving community. if you haven’t explored the underwater world yet, please contact me and let’s go diving! you can email me at: jeremy@scubajer.com for more information. dive safe! aloha!

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Getting Jelly With It in Palau

Feb. 5, 2015
A group of us ventured to Palau to do some diving but before we hit the open ocean we stopped by the famous Jellyfish Lake – apparently one of two in the world (the other in Sangalaki, Indonesia – which I’ve also dove!) but Palau’s Jelly’s were simply magical! A great experience – these harmless Jelly’s have formed their own species and are “stingless” gentle, shy creatures. Hope you enjoy this small clip I made from our Jelly Dive!

Marlin Madness Trailer

on a recent trip to Tonga we managed to hook this monster. have a look at the teaser i made above and the full youtube clip below. enjoy!

humpback whales in tonga 2014

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on july 26 i flew with some friends down to the Kingdom of Tonga to experience one of the most memorable dives of my lifetime. words cannot express the thrill and excitement of being amongst the oceans’ most magnificent creatures – the mighty humpback whale. every august and september the whales leave the cold antarctic waters and migrate north to the warm 24 deg C waters of Tonga to frolic and play in the tropical blue paradise waters. thanks to Masa Takashima from tonga-world.com and his team, we were able to swim and film/photograph these magnificent creatures. these are some of the photos i captured from my dive. enjoy.
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happy 20th anniversary boeing 777

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Happy 20th anniversary to our “Honolulu Baby” B-HNL formerly known as WA001.  I am proud to say I was probably among the first Cathay pilot’s to ever lay hands on this aircraft. The Backstory: In 1994 when I was a struggling regional airline pilot in the U.S., I was fortunate to be invited by some of my Boeing Co. friends to the rollout ceremony of WA001, the very first Boeing 777 ever produced at the Renton, Washington plant north of Seattle. It was a spectacular laser-show gala produced by Dick Clark Productions and when the curtain was lifted and the 777 revealed, I had no idea I was witnessing the beginning of a new era in aviation. I was able to place my thumb print on the belly of WA001 along with hundreds of other Boeing family and friends. I still have my original obligatory Boeing 777 polo shirt (which amazingly still fits after 20 years!) and all who were in attendance also received a special “777 lunch bag” commemorating the occasion full of food and goodies celebrating Boeing’s new ground-breaking management-style labeled “Working Together.” I still keep it as a remembrance.  As awe inspired as I was, little did I realize or even dream that exactly 10 years later I would climb into WA001, now B-HNL at Cathay Pacific, and pass my “QL” line check in that very aircraft.  The only Boeing 777 to ever fly with two engine-types (when I first saw her she sported brand new Pratt & Whitney 4090 turbofans) and completely rebuilt for Cathay – if you are lucky to fly B-HNL she is as sporty and lively as ever and after 20 young years will not disappoint. Aloha baby!

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olsob, whale sharks

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last week, i went to cebu and stayed at yoshi hirata’s resort in cebu (mactan) club paraiso / pcom dream. yoshi is a marine biologist who moved from tokyo to the philippines to start up his own dive operation. he is the #1 world premiere whale shark photographer (published by the likes of national geographic and BBC) and not only is he among the world’s best marine photographers, he is also a fantastic chef!  he arranged for us to dive with the resident whale sharks that frequent the shallow waters of oslob, 3 hours south of cebu. the following are some shots i got of these gentle giants. we encountered around 6 of them on 2 dives with the largest being around 10m (over 30 feet) long. i took these shots with the 5d mark iii in natural light with a nauticam NA-5DMIII underwater housing and ultra wide angle canon 16-35mm f/2.8 L II USM lens. click the image for full size.

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hippocampus bargibanti

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i just returned from anilao, in batangas, philippines testing out my new nauticam NA-5DMKIII housing for my canon 5D Mark III DSLR camera. it was my first attempt at super macro photography and was terrific fun. one of my favourite macro finds (i think i can speak for most divers) is the ever shy pygmy seahorse (scentific name hippocampus bargibanti). these tiny creatures measure around the size of your pinky fingernail and are generally found well camouflaged amongst soft corals and gorgonian sea fans. i found this little guy (pictured above) hiding amongst a sea fan with around 6 other of his (or her…i’m still learning to tell the difference) companions! an adult can measure as short as 13 mm in length – that’s around 1/2 an inch! pygmy seahorses are unique in that they breathe through a single gill slit on the back of their heads, as opposed to the more common seahorse that has gill slits on both sides of its head. but similar to the common seahorse, the males brood and take care of their young. i took this photo while in anilao with my canon 5d mark III DSLR inside a nauticam NA-5DMKIII housing, dual inon Z240 strobes, f11, 1/125 sec, canon 100mm f2.8L macro IS USM lens. – jeremy